20 8 / 2014

19 8 / 2014

19 8 / 2014

18 8 / 2014

18 8 / 2014

overseerr:


unexplained-events:

Being the only surgeon in the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Leonid Rogozov (27) had to perform surgeory on himself when he found out that his appendix was inflamed and could burst any moment. With the assistance of a meteorologist and an engineer (and some local anesthesia) he removed his appendix. Bad ass.

overseerr:

unexplained-events:

Being the only surgeon in the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Leonid Rogozov (27) had to perform surgeory on himself when he found out that his appendix was inflamed and could burst any moment. With the assistance of a meteorologist and an engineer (and some local anesthesia) he removed his appendix. Bad ass.

(via rizzafasho)

15 8 / 2014

I woke up bright and early at the ripe ol’ time of 5:00 AM for no good reason. Yep, that’s right, me… the very same gal who can sleep until 1:00 PM, wake up for a couple hours, then go take a nap. It’s 6:22 AM, and I’ve already made coffee for the hubs and I, made him lunch, reorganized and decluttered the utensils drawer, unloaded and loaded the dishwasher, and answered some emails. Anyone who knows my sleeping habits and my general disposition before noon would be absolutely shocked. I’ll say this though: I could totally dig this newfound energy!!!

image

15 8 / 2014

A beautifully written letter…

mylifeasamedstudent:

Dear Ms B,

We didn’t know each other well. You might recognise my face from rounds, I was the girl in the corner holding your numbers, looking at the ground or out the window. I occasionally asked you how you were, and you always told me the same thing – pain, so much pain. And I didn’t know…

14 8 / 2014

I’m seriously so bummed. This morning was the organic chemistry final, and for the second time, I’m pretty sure I failed it. I am retaking organic chemistry because I got a C- last semester… and deciding to take it in the summer at Wash U in a 5 week course was maybe the craziest decision I ever made. It. Was. Horrible. I started out pretty strong this semester, but my motivation and energy waned pretty quickly… by the end of the 5 weeks, I was/am SO sick of this class. Today’s final was a massacre. The last page was extra credit - it asked what you thought would be on the exam that you didn’t see, what you wished you knew before taking the course, and what you learned from orgo. I was so worried about the questions that I had NO clue how to answer that I completely forgot to go back to get those 5 points. Who does that?! They were FIVE FREE POINTS, and I didn’t even get them. Omg. Pretty worried about my grade… 

I’m also on a super low amount of sleep. I’m going to take the rest of today off, and start MCAT studying first thing tomorrow. I just need to learn how to process something, then move on. I don’t want the memories of today or of the first MCAT to cloud my performance on the next MCAT. I really hope I’m not doing all of this in vain. UGH.

13 8 / 2014

chocolatesofamedstudent:

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.
No one knew what he had
But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.
It was a rare form of leukemia.
You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.
Do you know how he knew?
He read an article about it a few weeks before. 
Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests. 
Turns out, he was right.
Never forget, reading saves lives. 
To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.
This is why we do it.
This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.
And wake up before the sun.
This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.
Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.
This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.
Why we put our lives on hold.
Not for more letters to put behind our name.
Not for some number on a score sheet.
Not because mom told us to.
We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.
One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.
So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:
Reading saves lives.

Thank you so much for posting this! Right now I am between my semester exams, and this means the world. It is great motivation!
I hope to god everything right now is worth it. Sometimes pulling all-nighters, forgetting what day it is and studying all day makes me forget why I am doing this.
Here’s to hoping I pass this semester!

Note to self.

chocolatesofamedstudent:

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.

No one knew what he had

But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.

It was a rare form of leukemia.

You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.

Do you know how he knew?

He read an article about it a few weeks before.

Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests.

Turns out, he was right.

Never forget, reading saves lives.

To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.

This is why we do it.

This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.

And wake up before the sun.

This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.

Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.

This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.

Why we put our lives on hold.

Not for more letters to put behind our name.

Not for some number on a score sheet.

Not because mom told us to.

We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.

One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.

So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:

Reading saves lives.

Thank you so much for posting this! Right now I am between my semester exams, and this means the world. It is great motivation!

I hope to god everything right now is worth it. Sometimes pulling all-nighters, forgetting what day it is and studying all day makes me forget why I am doing this.

Here’s to hoping I pass this semester!

Note to self.

(via aspiringdoctors)

13 8 / 2014